Tag Archives: integrity

An Open Letter to Congress Part 1

“Where is the politician who has not promised to fight to the death for lower taxes — and who has not proceeded to vote for the very spending projects that make tax cuts impossible?”  ~Barry Goldwater

By Alden L. Benton

To all the members of the House of Representatives and the Senate:

We, the people, spoke last November and swept the majority of into office because of your campaign promises.

You all have made similar promises, promises to repeal Obamacare, restructure the tax code, and balance the budget.

We also want you to take steps to eliminate the national debt, return to the rule of law, and to drain the swamp that is Washington, D.C.

Words are cheap.

We are closely watching what you do, and so far, you have failed.

We have a warning for all of you from any political party: Do what we ask.  Period.  As my father would say, we want no ifs ands or buts.

It is called integrity.

If you fail us, if you break our trust, the only way you will ever see Washington, D.C., again will be through the windows of a tour bus.

Since most of you are career politicians who spend your days wheeling and dealing, peddling lies, corruption, influence, while pursuing obstructive self-interest and party political gain, it is clear that none of you have a clue what integrity means.

Integrity is defined as an adherence to moral and ethical principles; having a soundness of moral character; honesty, the state of being whole, entire, or undiminished.

Your constituents demand integrity, the alignment of your words and your deeds.

To act without integrity makes you undependable, corrupt, a liar, and unfit to clean the toilets in your respective legislative chambers, let alone the privilege of representing the people of your respective states.

We are weary of your ineffectiveness, your sloth, your blatant, self-serving submission to the lobbying class, and your cowardice.

In fear, you retreat from your responsibilities to us.  You refuse to effectively and boldly, face the issues that plague our nation out of fear you will lose the next election, or fear that you may offend a big donor, whether they are the likes of George Soros or the Koch brothers.

You serve us.  You have sworn to uphold the Constitution.  To do less is malfeasance of office and blatant cowardice.

The nation is in trouble.  We can no longer kick the proverbial can down the road.  The time is NOW.

I am the son of a working man and a stay-at-home mom.  My father and my brother served our nation with honor through military service.

It is your sacred duty to all veterans, living and dead, and to every citizen of the United States of America, to save this great country from its pending destruction, both financial and social.

“The most terrifying words in the English language are: I’m from the government and I’m here to help.”  ~Ronald Reagan


©2017 Alden L. Benton / Independence Creek Enterprises
All Rights Reserved
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Looking Back to Look Forward

By Alden L. Benton

At the end of the year most writers take a look back at the previous year.  This year, to celebrate the passing of 2015 and to usher in 2016, I am going to look back in order to look forward.

This week I have been looking back at all my blog posts since I began this blog.  In reviewing what I have written, I found two posts from 2012 that are just as relevant today, perhaps more so, than they were four years ago.  An Unreasonable Man from February 1, 2012, and from August 23, 2012, Promises.


An Unreasonable Man

“The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself.  Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.”  ~George Bernard Shaw

By Alden L. Benton

To many, I am an unreasonable man.  I believe in God, morality, and the Constitution.  Being of Scots-Irish ancestry, I will not bend or bow before any earthly power and will fight to the death those who would try to force me to do otherwise.

I believe that life, for a moral and ethical person, is really quite simple: things are either right, or they are wrong.  There are no gray areas, no nuances; right or wrong, no more, no less.  This mindset enables and supports my everyday decision-making process.

I ask every moral and ethical person to consider this paradigm when deciding who will be our next president.

We will hear all manner of falsifications, misinformation, vitriol, charges, counter charges, and other useless information throughout the campaign.  Ignore it!  Look instead to the candidates’ records and to their public character and use your moral conscience to decide who is, or is not worthy of your support.

It is moral men and women who vote their conscience who will ultimately save America.  Moreover, one’s moral compass must be the ultimate guide in selecting a president who will lead with strength and determination rooted in the Constitution, and in his own moral and ethical rectitude.

Thomas Paine once wrote,

“These are the times that try men’s souls.  The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman.  Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.  What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value.”
~Thomas Paine, The Crisis, December 23, 1776

Now, 239 years later, our nation is again in crisis.  The policies of the previous century have failed and threaten to enslave not only this generation, but generations to come.

If you believe in America, its exceptionalism, in an individual’s God-given right to pursue life, liberty, and happiness as they see fit, then you must exercise your conscience and your moral fortitude to stand against the forces that are amassed at our gates bent on destroying us.

“If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace.  We ask not your counsels or your arms.  Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you.  May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that you were our countrymen.”
~Samuel Adams


Promises

By Alden L. Benton

Promises are important in every society. Anytime two or more people need to accomplish a task or engage in commerce, promises are integral to the arrangement.

Promises take many forms and range from God’s promise to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob in the Old Testament to His promise to us all in John 3:16 in the New Testament. On another level, there are promises we make to our children, our spouses, and our elderly. In the broader society, promises are represented by contracts, laws, and, ultimately, the Constitution.

Without these rules, these agreements, society would soon cease to function.  From deciding which side of the highway we will drive upon, who will have the right-of-way, to the guarantees of a contract and the prohibitions, the minimum moral code, embodied by the body of statutory law, society would soon revert to chaos.

This is the essence of ordered liberty and of a moral society. Ordered liberty imposes a minimum order on the free will of mankind. It ensures a free society based on fundamental rights such as due process, property rights, contract rights and obligations, as well as a minimum acceptable moral and ethical standard.

When promises are broken and agreements abrogated, that minimum moral code has not been honored.  Today, these obligations and promises are seen in relative terms. Put simply, this is chaos and it is breaking down the fabric of our society.

Signed for a mortgage you could never repay? Don’t worry, it doesn’t matter, we’ll make someone else pay. Don’t have a home because you didn’t pay your mortgage? It doesn’t matter, go take over an empty house the bank owns.

Promise your children something special if they behave? Stand by your words or they will never trust you again. Told your grandmother you’d visit her and begged off with some lame excuse? You hurt her more than you could ever know.

The issue for us all, individually or as a society, is integrity. Integrity is the unification of word and deed; of intent and action. As an old adage says, “I can’t hear your words because your actions are so loud.”

Integrity is a standard to which we must hold ourselves accountable and judge others by. It is a simple binary (one or zero) decision: they have it or not. Do they keep their promises, honor their contracts, obey the law (moral and legal), and, in the United States, respect the supreme law of the land – the Constitution?

No one is perfect, but we, both as individuals and as a society, must strive to attain and maintain personal integrity. Without it, we are nothing but charlatans and thieves.

Remember this every time you make, or accept, a promise.

Remember this when you cast your ballot next November.


© 2012 and 2015 by Alden L. Benton / Independence Creek Enterprises

Words

By Alden L. Benton

Words.

I have spent my entire adult life working with words as a writer, an editor, and for the last year, a blogger.  Communication, either spoken or written, is the essence of being human and the foundation of civilization.

Words are the essence of communication and for communication to be effective, words must have distinct meanings, definitions, which are understood by all who speak the same language.

In my August 23, 2012 post I talked about promises and integrity.  Words, and their definitions, are a major component of the foundation of integrity; that is saying what one means and doing what one says.

In what laughably masquerades as political discourse of the last 50 years, the discussion has devolved into a quagmire of ad hominem (personal) attacks, lies, name calling, and re-definition of words to attain all too often nefarious ends.

Only by understanding the true definition of words can one spot the false, manipulative use of those same words.  To that end, in this and subsequent posts, I offer the true definition of frequently misused political terms.  Armed with facts and truth one will always be victorious.  This is why the Left continually redefines words to suit their purpose, constantly engages in ad hominem attacks on the character of their opponents, and constantly lies to distract from their dearth of facts.  As Bill O’Reilly once said in an interview with the late Tim Russert, “They [the Left] can’t beat me with facts, so they attack me personally.”

The first definition I want to put forth is conservative. Conservative is not a new term, in fact, its origin is some 2,500 years old and can be traced to Aristotle.

According to Benjamin Wiker in his book 10 Books Every Conservative Must Read, to be conservative one must believe that political life and morality are natural, not man-made.  Additionally, human beings are not infinitely malleable and morality is objective, not subjective, and puts limits on what humans can and should do.

Conservatives look at the world as it is not how they would like it to be and value respect experience over theory as abstract theory is divorced from experience.

Wiker goes on to state that for conservatives, experience and knowledge go together and that the foundation of society stems from the male-female union — the family.  From the family comes a village and from the village a city.  It takes a family to raise a child, not a village.

“Liberals see no problem with reconstituting a nation’s political life on the basis of some attractive but untried rational scheme used as a template to draw up programs of ‘hope and change,’” according to Wiker.


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©2012 Alden L. Benton/Independence Creek Enterprises
All Rights Reserved

Promises

By Alden L. Benton

Promises are important in every society. Anytime two or more people need to accomplish a task or engage in commerce, promises are integral to the arrangement.

Promises take many forms and range from God’s promise to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob in the Old Testament to His promise in John 3:16 in the New Testament. On another level, there are promises we make to our children, our spouses, and our elderly. In the broader society, promises are represented by contracts, laws, and, ultimately, the Constitution.

Without these rules, these agreements, society would soon cease to function.  From deciding which side of the highway we will drive upon, who will have the right-of-way, to the guarantees of a contract and the prohibitions, the minimum moral code, embodied by the body of statutory law, society would soon revert to chaos without them.

This is the essence of ordered liberty and of a moral society. Ordered liberty imposes a minimum order on the free will of mankind. It ensures a free society based on fundamental rights such as due process, property rights, contract rights and obligations, as well as a minimum acceptable moral and ethical standard.

When promises are broken and agreements abrogated, that minimum moral code has not been honored.  Today, these obligations and promises are seen in relative terms. Put simply, this is chaos and it is breaking down the fabric of our society.

Signed for a mortgage you could never repay? Don’t worry, it doesn’t matter, we’ll make someone else pay. Don’t have a home because you didn’t pay your mortgage? It doesn’t matter, go take over an empty house the bank owns.

Promise your children something special if they behave? Stand by your words or they will never trust you again. Told your grandmother you’d visit her and begged off with some lame excuse? You hurt her more than you could ever know.

The issue for us all, individually or as a society, is integrity. Integrity is the unification of word and deed; of intent and action. As an old adage says, “I can’t hear your words because your actions are so loud.”

Integrity is a stand to which we must hold ourselves accountable and judge others by. It is a simple binary (one or zero) decision: they have it or not. Do they keep their promises, honor their contracts, obey the law (moral and legal), and, in the United States, respect the supreme law of the land – the Constitution?

No one is perfect, but we, both as individuals and as a society, must strive to attain and maintain personal integrity. Without it, we are nothing but charlatans and thieves.

Remember this every time you make, or accept, a promise. Remember this when you cast your ballot on November 6.


Follow me on Twitter @AldenBenton, on Facebook or
sign up for a free email subscription.
©2012 Alden L. Benton/Independence Creek Enterprises
All Rights Reserved